Committee

Dr J.J. Child

Dr J.J. Child

University of Sussex – Director

Biography 

Dr John Child is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sussex; Co-founding Director of the Sussex Crime Research Centre; and Co-founding Director of and Criminal Law Reform Now Network. [University Profile]

John has been at Sussex Law School since 2013. Prior to this, John was a Lecturer (2010-11) and Senior Lecturer (2011-13) at Oxford Brookes Law School. John completed his PhD at the University of Birmingham; he also worked as a research assistant on the Criminal Law Team at the Law Commission for England and Wales.

John has held visiting positions at Boston University; the University of Birmingham; as well as the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg. 

 

Research

John’s research interests centre on criminal law theory and doctrine, where he has published widely.

John's publications can be found at:

http://ssrn.com/author=2174528  

https://sussex.academia.edu/JohnChild

Dr J. Rogers

Dr J. Rogers

UCL – Director

Biography

 Dr Jonathan Rogers gained his undergraduate degree in law from the University of Nottingham and completed his PhD at UCL in 1999. He accepted his first full-time lectureship at Brunel University in 2000 and moved to UCL in 2002, and has been a Senior Lecturer there since 2010. He lectures in criminal law, evidence, criminal procedure and human rights. He has also been a Fellow of Middle Temple since 2009. He gives talks to practitioner audiences on a variety of criminal justice topics, including to date domestic violence, criminal attempts, bad character evidence, hearsay evidence, prosecutorial discretion and review of prosecutorial decisions.

 

Research

Jonathan’s research interests cover a range of fields, from substantive criminal law to procedure and evidence. More information, including a list of publications, is available on Jonathan’s UCL staff profile.

 

Professor Liz Campbell

Professor Liz Campbell

University of Durham

Biography

Prof Liz Campbell is a Professor of Criminal Law at Durham Law School and convenor of the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. She is also the School’s Director of Research Funding, and a member of the AHRC Peer Review College. For more information, see Liz’s staff profile at the University of Durham.

 

Research

Liz’s research looks at how and in what ways the criminal law and criminal process responds to politicised social problems. She is interested in how legal definitions are constructed, and how the politics of definitions determines and affects legal measures. She uses this lens to explore laws on organised crime, white collar crime and corruption, the presumption of innocence, and the trial process more broadly. Her work is socio-legal in considering the law in context, and often involves a comparative dimension. There is an empirical element to some of her work, such as the project on “Corporate Vehicles – Understanding the use of ‘Licit’ Corporate Entities by Transnational Organised Crime Groups in the Concealment, Conversion and Control of Illicit Finance”.

 Liz publishes widely in leading international and domestic journals. Her publications include a research monograph on Organised Crime and the Law (Hart, 2013), a jointly written book on The Collection and Retention of DNA from Suspects in New Zealand with Nessa Lynch (Victoria University Press, 2015) and a textbook on Criminal Law in Ireland (Clarus, 2010).

Mr Simon McKay

Mr Simon McKay

Barrister

Mr Paul Jarvis

Mr Paul Jarvis

Barrister

Paul Jarvis is a barrister in private practice at 6KBW College Hill in London.  He is also Treasury Counsel at the Central Criminal Court, appointed by the Attorney General to handle the most complex prosecution cases in the country.  His practice generally encompasses prosecuting and defending in cases of homicide, fraud and serious sexual offending.  He is ranked in Chambers and Partners and the Legal 500 as a leading barrister in the areas of crime, fraud and the proceeds of crime.  He has previously worked with the Criminal Team at the Law Commission for England and Wales.  He is a contributor to Blackstones’ Criminal Practice, now the leading practitioner text in the field of criminal law, and Millington and Sutherland Williams on the Proceeds of Crime.  He has written articles for the Criminal Law Review, Archbold Review, Blackstone’s Quarterly and the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg. He is also a case commentator for Lloyd’s Law Reports: Financial Crime.  He is a member of the Education Committee of the Criminal Bar Association, in which role he co-convenes the Assize Seminars which are a joint programme of events organised in conjunction with the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford and UCL to explore current topics in criminal law.  He is an active member of the legal charity JUSTICE, and is part of a team currently looking into reform of the way in which sexual offences are prosecuted and tried in England and Wales.  His chambers’ profile can be viewed here: http://www.6kbw.com/people/barristers/paul-jarvis

Ms Abigail Bright

Ms Abigail Bright

Barrister

With a strong academic background, Abigail’s practice is diverse. Whilst reading for the Bar, Abigail taught criminal law at UCL as an honorary faculty teaching fellow and worked as an honorary research fellow at UCL and the University of Oxford. In 2010, Abigail was examined by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries for the Dip.FMS, diploma in forensic medical sciences, at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Abigail brings a public law-oriented strategy to her instructions in criminal and civil cases. She has a significant profile in fraud, financial crime, and extradition. She practises in several areas of chambers’ expertise, including: instructions to prosecute in financial regulatory hearings; instructions to defend in regulatory hearings; statutory and non-statutory public inquiries; jury and trial advocacy, referral appeals; judicial review; injunctions and damages against public authorities. Abigail has a proven practical grasp of the courts’ jealous protection of legal professional privilege. In 2014, Abigail acted for all claimants in three successful judicial reviews of the issue and execution of search warrants: Khajag Kouyoumjian, Sarkis Kouyoumjian v. Hammersmith Magistrates' Court; The Metropolitan Police [2015] A.C.D. 27; R. (AB and CD) v. Huddersfield Magistrates’ Court and the Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2014] 2 Cr.App.R. 25; R. (on the application of S, F, and L) v. Chief Constable of the British Transport Police; Southwark Crown Court [2014] 1 W.L.R. 1647, reported as a Practice Note. Orders of anonymity were secured in respect of five claimants (AB, CD, S, F, and L) in those judicial reviews. Anonymity was sought because all claimants were solicitors or solicitors’ firms.
In 2017, Abigail represented the interests of a member of the Special Air Service (‘SAS’) in a warrants claim against the Metropolitan Police Service (Kingsley Napley instructing). The Force initially asserted public interest immunity as a bar to the claimant obtaining the information underlying the application made for the warrant that permitted a search of his home. On receiving the claimant’s written submissions, the Force then withdraw that objection. The claim against the Force settled, with costs agreed. In 2012, led by Edward Fitzgerald Q.C., Abigail appeared for the appellant Danilo Restivo (a.k.a. ‘the hair fetishist killer’) before a special constitution of the Court of Appeal, Criminal Division: the Court acceded to the appellant’s submissions and set aside as wrong in principle Restivo’s whole life order. Five years later, in 2017, Edward Fitzgerald Q.C. and Abigail next secured success for Restivo when defending Restivo in Italian-UK extradition proceedings: the Court acceded to Restivo’s submissions that extradition proceedings in his case should not be opened formally until the year 2050. In 2015, Abigail appeared for one of the claimants before the Investigatory Powers Tribunal in (1) Caroline Lucas MP; (2) Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb AM; (3) George Galloway v. (1) Security Service; (2) Secret Intelligence Service; (3) Government Communications Headquarters; (4) Secretary of State for The Home Department; (5) Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2015] UKIPTrib 14_79-CH. In 2014, Abigail appeared in three murder trials; she writes the Westlaw digests for homicide offences including entries on murder and infanticide. Abigail has been instructed as counsel to non-statutory and statutory public inquiries. She was instructed as counsel to the statutory inquiry at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (‘IICSA’) and as counsel to the Undercover Policing Inquiry (‘UCPI’). In 2010 and 2011 she was instructed as noting counsel by the Department of Health and Social Care to note the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry. She is regularly interviewed by LexisNexis Corporate Crime on issues of E.U. competition law in response to parliamentary debates and committees reporting on ‘Brexit’.